Dear Santa

Dear Santa,  It is hard to believe it has been a whole year since I last wrote to you.  I hope you are doing well and you are healthy.  Our year has been one that has taken us to really happy places and to some very sad ones as well but you already know that, after all you are Santa.

I know you are used to reading letters asking for toys or gifts for others but the things I am asking for are so different.  I believe that Christmas is a magical time, with thoughts of magic in mind, I hope the things I am asking for could be possible.

When I think about what I want for this year, I think my heart wants peace.  The kind of peace that comes from within and helps with handling all the things that come my way. Parents of special needs children can never really control what we will be facing each day, so this kind of peace is priceless.  We have all faced days when we feel anything but peace.  Please leave that for us Santa, I know you understand.

When I think of this year, I can see the milestones that Elizabeth has achieved, the successes we have played a part in.  I ask Santa, for all of us that we have a strong memory for these good things.  That somehow we will all remember these good, happy moments.  How quickly, we can find ourselves focusing on what went wrong or what we need to do, instead of calling up a good thought or success.  I ask for all of us who have those special children, the memory of the good to shine just a bit brighter and stronger than the negatives.

At the beginning of this year, I had a very sick Dad, at the end of the year, I do not have a Dad on this earth anymore.  I am sad for sure, Santa.  I miss the man who always watched out “just a bit more” for his little girl, I miss that man who would smile at me with those blue eyes that transmitted more love than a 1,000 words could ever say.  Will I see those eyes again?  I hold the belief in my heart that one day I will.  But I ask Santa, for all of us parents of special children to have the clarity of thought to “live in the moment” to hug, love, cherish and be thankful for those we love so much, while they are hear with us to love, to hug or to look into their faces.  So much of life is busy and sometimes that busyness obscures our view of just what is important right now.  I am so in need of this clarity, Santa, as this year has been quite difficult.

I hope you like the cookies we left for you,  Elizabeth helped to make them,  She is continually learning and growing.  We have all grown with her on this journey.  I ask Santa, that those working with our children in the schools be given the gift of empathy, and belief in our children.  We know they can learn and succeed and we know how they learn.  I ask that those working with our children have this presents…each and everyday…our children need them to!

Thank you Santa, for reading my letter, I know you will do your best.

Merry Christmas to you Santa, with God’s will, we will be here next year to write to you, share our wishes and ask for some Christmas magic once again.

Blessing to everyone at this special time of year.


Lessons From A Nursing Home

I never really thought about it, the fact that each moment you can walk out of a door to the outside should be regarded as a great moment.  Or the chance you have to sit outside your home and watch the trees blow in the wind.  Or the fact that when you get to pick what you want for dinner and feed yourself you should rejoice.   I never thought about these things until my family was brought face to face with the world of a nursing home.

As many know who follow my Facebook, my beloved Dad recently passed away after being in the nursing home for over three years.  Dad was an amazing man. Full of love and wisdom, hugs and humor.  To watch his decline and spend his last days holding his hand have left me quite emotional and if I am truthful, quite pensive.  I prayed for his peace, I prayed for him to go to God, and now that he has, we are left…thinking.

I can remember one particular Sunday, after being there at around 9:00 to noon to help my mom.  I was headed home, I rounded the corner to get to the door and I looked at a little older gentleman in a wheelchair.  He was sitting there staring out the door…just staring.  I said” good afternoon” to him and also “excuse me”  as I went around his chair and pushed open the first of two doors to get out.  I was greeted by fresh, cold air (it was Winter).  But that air that felt too cold just the other day, felt fantastic at that moment.  It was that one moment, that one second in my life I will alway remember.  I was alive, able to move, able to go where I wanted.The man in the wheelchair could only look.  This moment has been the catalyst to so many thoughts over the three years. Continue reading

My First Product Review- The Master Opener from Kuhn Rikon

We bought this opener in December of 2013, I had had such a hard time getting Elizabeth to open cans for our cooking time or for her snacks ( she loves tomato soup).  I saw this and thought “Yes, something that will keep her hands safe”

She and I talked about how to use it and worked on her hand grip to get the right angle to get the hook under the can tab.  We practiced and practiced and then she GOT IT!   Lid off….soup is on!

We have worked on the other types of cans and bottles it opens and it really does help.

I advise watching them as they do this, so as to avoid a cut or other mishap.

For us, with Elizabeth’s dyspraxia, it is all about practice and practice.  It was hard for Elizabeth to orient herself as to which way to hold the opener, so I drew a smile face of the side of the tab opener that would be facing her when in use.  I told her to always look at the smile face.  This helped her to process which way to hold the handle and aided in her success.

I hope this product will help your child be just that much more independent.  Good luck!!